American Literature SMSA

Starting Out - Expectations

August 29th:

-

- In-Class Introduction Assignment

    Letter to Mrs. Finkenstein   (collected at the end of class)

August 30th:

 

August 31st:

 

1. Think About It: Common Core to Life   &   Think About It: Common Core to Life 2

2. Review "Conscientious"

 

September 1st:

Purpose:

-          Get a feel for how students annotate/take notes on a text and how they annotate when watching a film.

-          Offer students a chance to apply crime scene thinking to reading a poem and taking notes.

Intro:

-          Go over “How Would You Investigate a Crime?” and “How to Apply Investigating a Crime Scene to Analyzing a Poem”  (that they received and read in pairs yesterday)

Crime/Accident Investigation Process and How It Relates to Poetry(Review as Class)

Independent Work:

-          Read and Annotate “Out, Out” while applying crime scene thinking. (Out Out Poem sheet with questions)

Group Discussion:

-          Go over your annotations at your table, breaking down the “crime scene” of the poem and answer the questions together.

Watch:

-          Paper Towns and Why Learning Is Awesome

Students must complete the Cornell Notes while watching.

HW:

-          Finish watching the film, Paper Towns and Why Learning Is Awesome,

and complete the cornell notes sheet.

 

 

September 11th:

 -          Watch Voices from Inside the Towers documentary

Students Copy Down “The Way It Is” by William Stafford into their notebooks.

Students take down the board questions in the Questions column of the Cornell Sheet:

1.       Why do Americans still commemorate 9/11 sixteen years after it happened?

2.       How does the images and sounds influence the emotions of the audience?

While watching students take down what stands out to them regarding the 9/11 documentary.

Summarize Section at Bottom of the Cornell Sheet:

-          How did its usage of audio and visuals affect your understanding of the topic?

-          Why are visuals and audio used so extensively when discussing 9/11?

September 12th:

 1. Think About It: After 9/11 Inferences

2. Review TONE vs MOOD

                            TONE VS MOOD

                        (Don’t get them confused!)

Tone: how the speaker feels

Example:

            Martin is a jackass!

How do you infer the speaker is feeling (or what is the tone)?

Mood: how the audience is influenced to feel

Example:

            The rain wept from the sky steadily as we trudged to the cemetery.

How is the author trying to make the audience feel? 

 3. Visual & Auditory Literacy Connection:

     Watch/Listen to "To the Boys Who May One Day Date My Daughter" by Jesse Parent

          - What variations of "tone" does the speaker utilize?

          - How does he create a "mood" for his intended audience and his listening audience (those he is not directly addressing)?

          - How does his tone relate/influence the mood he creates?

 4.  Read the two 9/11 Poems   If They Could Speak and List of "Don't Forgets" and "Remembers". 

      - Annotate the poems specifically looking for the tone of the speakers and the mood that the writers create for the audience.

 5. Read and Annotate  "Letter to Any Would-Be Terrorists" by Naomi Shihab Nye.

       - Focus on tone of the writer in your annotations.

       - Answer the first five questions on the worksheets.

HW: Read the rest of the Naomi Shihab Nye poems from the packet and answer the last two questions on the worksheets.

September 13th:

 

Purpose:

- Connect "empathy" and "antipathy" to what we previously learned about 9/11 and Naomi Shihab Nye.

-          Have students learn & review Individualism, Collectivism, Ethics & Law  (seeing the relationships between them)

Bell Work:  (Write in Notebook)

Take down etymology for “Empathy” and “Antipathy” from white boards.

Epigraphs:

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

“We must welcome the future, remembering that soon it will be the past; and we must respect the past, remembering that it was once all that was humanly possible.”

§  George Santayana

"If we read one another, we won't kill one another."

§  Dr. Salma Jayyusi

Class Review:  (QUIZ ON TUESDAY)

(All definitions and details posted on Individualism Etc page)

-          Individualism

-          Collectivism

-          Ethics

-          Law

In the US, laws are agreed upon and enforced on behalf of the collective majority (meaning the largest group decides what is best for everyone).

Ethics, though it may have its base in collective traditions and beliefs, is decided upon and adopted by the individual.  While there may be a collective that recognizes the ethics, it is enforced by the individual upon themselves.

Group Discussion Questions:

Is the majority always “right” or ethical when it insists on a course of action that benefits itself but harms a minority?

Are there points where either a law can be unethical or ethics can cause one to break the law?

Are there points where a person can choose to ignore their ethics in order to follow the majority?  What can the problems be in doing that?

Are there points where government can fail to represent the majority or the government fails because what the majority wants is unethical?

 

September 14th

 Independent Reading:

“Swept Up in a Dragnet…”

“My post 9/11 American nightmare”

“Muslim American caught up in post-9/11 sweep”

Independent Questions

Answer each question on white-lined paper in four to five sentences each (answer all the prompts COMPLETELY with reasoning and details from the readings to back up your answers).

A.      Why did the government detain 1,200 Muslim people incommunicado (unable to communicate with family or legal representation) by November 1, 2001 {after 9/11}?  (Be careful to consider the difference between “officially stated” reasons versus the “emotional” or “knee-jerk” reasons that resulted from the event of 9/11.)

B.      Was the Muslim detainment after 9/11 legal?  Why or why not? Explain.

C.      Was the Muslim detainment after 9/11 ethical?  Why or why not? Explain.

D.      How did what happened with the detainment relate to Naomi Shihab Nye’s concerns expressed in her letter that we went over yesterday?  Explain.

E.       Does a simple apology enough after this event?  Can more be done?  Why or why not?  {Why might the government choose to stop at an apology rather than do more?}  Explain.

 

Reflection:

A.      Looking at the texts, what were some of the long term impacts of 9/11?  How were people influenced?  Explain.

B.      Were some of the responses to 9/11 fair?  Why or why not?  (Use quotes from the text to support arguments.)

 September 15

Purpose:

-          Review TREE format for “A” Level papers.

-          Have students look at sample answers in an evaluative fashion and apply what they know from the format.

-          Discuss their evaluations in pairs, groups and as a class.

-          Apply their new knowledge to two of the answers they created for yesterday’s reading.

1. Think About It:

A. What do you think makes an "A" level answer?  (What elements should be included for a comprehension question answer to receive an "A" grade?)

B. What might prevent a person from writing an "A" level answer? 

2. Review “TREE” format as a class.  TREE Method Model.

3. Pairs:

Evaluate sample answers from Nye questions.

Determine what would improve the answers

4. Groups:

Compare evaluations, find out what is similar and what is different.

5. Class Survey:

Survey the grades groups assigned to the sample answers.

6. Individual Work:

-          Take two of your answers from yesterday’s work, identify how to improve them using the TREE method and then re-write the answer reflecting improvement.

7. Reflection:

-What have you learned?

- How will it help you? 

HW: Study for the "Individualism & Collectivism" Term quiz.

 (All definitions and details posted on Individualism Etc page)

 

 

 September 18

Watch Pearl Harbor Documentaries

      - Tora, Tora, Tora - The True Story of Pearl Harbor

      - World War II - Attack on Pearl Harbor

 Complete Cornell Notes w/ Reflection

 

September 25

 

-          Purpose:

o   Consider the concept of “presumption of innocence” in relation to the Japanese Internment.

o   Review roots for major class concepts

o   Review reflection tanka model

o   Complete Reflection Tankas and share as a class

o   Apply Accountable Talk Stems to reading on cards

 

1.       Think About It: Presumption of Innocence

a.       Teacher checks annotations on text while students do Bell Work

2.       Denotation, Connotation & Explication roots review

3.       Write three tankas (Academic model) or five tankas (Honors model) that capture three important details in Evacuation Order No 19 Chapter and write the reflection for each (use the worksheet provided each day).

4.       Class Sharing

5.       Choose two of the Initiating Accountable Talk stems from the board

a.       Write two complete statements based on the weekend’s reading  on the notecard.

HW:

Block 3 (Academic) Read and annotate Ch. Train of When the Emperor Was Divine (p 23 – 48)

Block 5 (Honors) Read Snow Falling on Cedars and take indirect character sheet notes for p 94-151

 

 

Students reviewed the Think About It Grading Guidelines

After examining five models and practicing evaluating and tallying the grades for the entries (Think About It Tally Sheet), students then had to review their Think About It from yesterday, tally their points and use the information to revise & rewrite (Think About It Re-write Sheet) their entries.

 

3. Out Out by Robert Frost  MP3

    - students must annotate the poem

    - complete the sheet questions and letter


 Denotation, Connotation, Annotation, Explication Vocabulary & Etymology Sheet

September 12th

1. Think About It: Walking at Night

2. Acquainted with the Night  video   video 2   Music video (music inspired by poem & using Frost's words)

   - Compare the films

   - How do the approaches influence audience mood?

September 13 - 14

1.       Think About It: Death

2.       Read Home Burial and annotate

                a.       MP3

3.       Comprehension Questions using TREE format

4.       Films

             a.       Film 1

             b.      Film 2

             c.       Poem response

5.       Fill out the Compare & Contrast Sheet for the films.

6.       Reflection: Do you think the poem is realistic to how grief works?  Why or why not?

September 15:

1.       Think About It: Individualism Context

2.       Class Review: Important Individualism & Collectivism Definitions

3.       We Wear the Mask MP3 – Annotations & Questions

                a.       Reading 1

                b.      Reading 2

                c.       Film 3

4.       Evolution of Poetry  (Expanding on the Connection)

5.       Maya Angelou annotate & answer the questions

               a.       Mask Film with Maya Angelou

               b.      Mask Film with Maya Angelou

6.       Reflection:  Which are you?

September 16:

1.       Think About It  (Side One & Side Two)

2.       Class Discussion: Why do we stand for the National Anthem?

3.       Read the articles:

           a.       49ers Quarterback Sits Out National Anthem To Protest Oppression Of Minorities

           b.      My Father Stood For The Anthem, For The Same Reason That Colin Kaepernick Sits

           c.       As a black veteran, I always stand for the flag. But I understand why Colin Kaepernick doesn’t

           d.       Jelani Jenkins: Why I Knelt During the National Anthem—And Why It’s Time to Stand Up

2.       Reflection

September 19:

1. Think About It: Bird Symbol

2. Meaning of a Symbol and Evolution of a Symbol

a.       Share responses from think about it.

3.       Go over poems:

           a.       Sympathy  by Paul Laurence Dunbar   Film

           b.      Heart of a Woman by Georgia Douglas Johnson Audio The Heart of a Woman

           c.       Your World by Georgia Douglas Johnson     Film Your World         visual film

           d.      I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou     Film Reading: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

2.       Creating a Visual

           a.       Draw a bird (your bird, design it to symbolize you)

Sample:

 3.       What Things Hold You Back?  (ten obstacles, written in sentence form)

          a.       What obstacles do you face that you feel hold you back?

          b.      Then, create bars using words of your obstacles.

Sample:

 

4.       Reflection: How do you build sympathy with others when you look at their bars?

Individualism, Collectivism & American Rhetoric

Tuesday, September 20: Individualism Literary Devices Study Sheet

1. Think About It: What do you think are your FIVE MOST IMPORTANT RIGHTS?  Why do you think they are important?  Explain.

2. Review Concepts as a Class:

Rhetoric: the art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing, especially the use of figures of speech and other compositional techniques.

What is Individualism?   What is Collectivism?  Important Definitions

Appeals: Logos, Ethos, Pathos, Kairos Information Sheet

Rhetorical Appeals: Logos, Ethos, Pathos pdf

3.Listen, read & annotate:

Patrick Henry's Speech to the Virginia Convention  (MP3)   (MP3)

4. Group Discussion Questions:

Answer the following on a separate sheet of white lined paper to be passed in for the group.  Answers should not be a single sentence, but should be roughly five sentences and include quotes from the text to support or illustrate the stands being made.

  1. Think about Henry’s famous statement, “Give me liberty or give me death!” Do you agree that liberty is more important than life itself?  Explain your answer.
  2. Imagine how each of these people might have responded to Henry’s speech:  
  3. A. An American born colonist whose grandparents were British 
  4. B. A Loyalist (meaning an American colonist who sides with the British)
  5. C. An African enslaved in the Virginia colony     
  6. D. A Native American
  7. Patrick Henry argued that the actions of King George III and the British Parliament posed major threats to the liberty of the American colonists.  In your opinion, what are the major threats to the liberty of Americans today?  Explain.

5. Reflection: Is Patrick Henry's speech persuasive?  Why or why not?  Explain.

Wednesday, September 21 - Thursday, September 22:

Primary vs Secondary Documents

- Think About It: So Angry You Destroy Property

Documentary: Liberty! The American Revolution Part 1 - The Boston Tea Party, Reluctant Revolutionaries

  - Students must take Cornell Notes while watching

- Read & Annotate The Intolerable Acts

     - Boston Port Bill

     - Administration of Justice Act

     - Quartering Act

- Reflection on The Intolerable Acts

 

- Think About It: Hang Together

 Declaration of Independence      film reading     MP3

Questions:

Answer on a separate sheet of white lined paper to be passed in for the group.  Answers should not be a single sentence, but should be roughly five sentences and include quotes from the text to support or illustrate the stands being made.

1.      Being aware of the four types of appeal from class, what types of appeal are used in the body of the Declaration and how are they used?  (Use at least one quote that illustrates each appeal that you find and explain how it fits that appeal).  Explain.

2.      What three reasons of complaint that justified the rebellion are the strongest in this text and why?  (Hint: they are in the section with the bullet points.)  Copy them down, summarize each complaint and explain why each would be important or particularly valid.

3.      By signing and publishing the Declaration, the fifty-six men involved were committing treason, which was punishable by death.  How strongly would they have had to feel about the complaints that they had to do this?  Would they have done this lightly?  Why or why not?  Explain

4.      Do you judge the complaints that they made to be strong enough to warrant the serious action they are taking (ie inciting rebellion and making it possible that they could be executed)?  Would you have done the same in their position?  Why or why not?  Explain.

Monday, September 26th:(Honors)

 Hypocrisy of Thomas Jefferson

Think About It: Does revealed hypocrisy of an individual potentially cancel out the respect for the same individual?

Read & Annotate the following articles/texts:

   The Dark Side of Thomas Jefferson

   Thomas Jefferson and Slavery

    Enlightenment (poem by Natasha Trethewey)

Reflection: Is Thomas Jefferson a hypocrite?

 

Tuesday, September 27th - Wednesday, September 28:

- Think About It: What does it mean to be an American?

 - Read & Annotate    

         Letter from Phillis Wheatley to Rev. Samson Occom  &  Letter from Abigail Adams to John Adams 

                Wheatley Letter MP3           Abigail Adams Letter MP3

Reflection: Based on what you are seeing in these letters, what are the main concerns of these women?  What does this reveal to you about their personal characters?  Explain. 

Ambiguity: "America" and Interpretation Power Point

"America" Analysis Exercise

Definition Essay Description

What is an American? by Michel-Guillaume Jean de Crevecoeur   MP3

Questions:

Answer the following on a separate sheet of paper.  Each question should be answered in at least five sentences and include quotes from the text to back up your interpretations and inferences.

  1. Why do you think de Crevecoeur feels that the American must be a new man?  Explain.
  2. To what extent do you think de Crevecoeur’s definition of an American still applies today?
    1. Groups that Crevecoeur does not mention
    2. Goals and lifestyles popular in America today
    3. How you define an American
  3. According to de Crevecoeur, what seems to be the reason so many immigrants come to the United States?  Explain.
  4. How similar are the motives of 18th-century immigrants and today’s immigrants to the United States? Support your answer. 

What is an American? by Peter J. Ferrara

Questions:

Answer all of the following questions on a separate sheet of paper. Each question should be answered in at least five sentences and include quotes from the text to back up your interpretations and inferences.

  1. What do you infer is Ferrara’s purpose for writing this piece?  Explain.
  2. How does Ferrara’s piece compare and contrast with Crevecoeur’s piece?  What details make them similar?  What details make them different?  Explain.
  3. Do you agree with Ferrara’s characterization of Americans?  Why or why not?  Explain.

"What Is an American?" Essay Writing Project

Thursday, September 29:

selection from Self-Reliance by Ralph Waldo Emerson  MP3

Answer all of the questions marked in the packet on a separate sheet of paper. Each question should be answered in at least five sentences and include quotes from the text to back up your interpretations and inferences.

- Which does Emerson value more - original thought or traditional wisdom?

- According to Emerson, which virtue does society demand most - truth, conformity, creativity, or self-reliance?

- What is the only law that Emerson says can be sacred to him?

- Describe situations or aspects of your own life in which Emerson's ideas about the importance of the individual might apply.  Consider the following:

      a. his idea that all people should be nonconformists

      b. his disregard for consistency in thought and deed

      c. peer pressures to conform to certain standards of appearance or behavior

- If Emerson had specifically addressed the institution of slavery in this essay, what do you think he would have said about it?

Friday, September 30:

Civil Disobedience (only paragraphs 1, 3, 4, 5, 17, 19, 22, 23, 27 & 28) by Henry David Thoreau  MP3

Answer all of the questions marked in the packet on a separate sheet of paper. Each question should be answered in at least five sentences and include quotes from the text to back up your interpretations and inferences.

- According to Thoreau, what should be respected more than the law?

- What should a citizen do about an unjust law?

- How does Thoreau respond to being jailed?

- How convincing do you find Thoreau's argument?  Consider the following:

     a. Thoreau's comment that a man must live according to his nature

     b. circumstances under which he advocates breaking the law

     c. his views on majority rule

- What might some find threatening about Thoreau's ideas?

- Thoreau's ideas influenced many 20th century reformers, notably Mohandas Gandhi, the Indian nationalist and spiritual leader.  What connections do you see between Thoreau's views and Gandhi's in the excerpt "On Civil Disobedience"?

Monday, October 3:

selections from Stride Toward Freedom by Martin Luther King Jr.  MP3

Evaluation Exercise: MLKjr

Tuesday, October 4:

Think About It: Malcolm X on Patriotism 

Necessary to Protect Ourselves by Malcolm X  MP3

Answer all of the questions marked in the packet on a separate sheet of paper. Each question should be answered in at least five sentences and include quotes from the text to back up your interpretations and inferences.

- Malcolm X compares the oppression of African Americans with that of American colonists under King George III.  He believes that "it is only fair to expect" African Americans to react to tyranny as the revolutionaries did.  Do you agree?

- Based on these two selections, which leader do you regard as more persuasive - King or Malcolm X?  Consider the following for both:

              a. each leader's intellectual arguments

              b. each leader's emotional appeals

              c. each leader's tone, or attitude

- Which leader do you think is more revolutionary - King or Malcolm X?  Consider the following for both:

             a. what "revolutionary" means to you

             b. each leader's arguments and results

Reflection & Synthesis Letter: MLK jr, Malcolm X & Black Lives Matter

Homework: 

Read 

Morgan Freeman Destroys ‘Black History Month’ With One Surprising Word

Morgan Freeman Wants You To Stop Talking About ‘Ridiculous’ Black History Month

Complete the Reflection

 

Interesting Extras:

Letter From Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King Jr  (video footage and reading)

    Think About It & Synthesis Letter Assignment 

I Have a Dream speech by Martin Luther King Jr.  (video footage)

Text with Questions

The Ballot or the Bullet speech by Malcolm X  (MP3 - parts may be out of sync with text)

Malcolm X Television Interview

Application of Individualism, Collectivism & Justice in Literature

Friday, March 11 - Monday, March 14

Juror Service Video for Connecticut

What you have learned about Jury Duty Reflection Sheet

Anticipation & After Reading Twelve Angry Men Sheet (originally found at this website which is EXCELLENT)

Reading Schedule for Twelve Angry Men

(For each night of the reading, students should take notes on the notes sheet and answer the comprehension questions for the specific act that they are reading).

March 11:     Act I      

March 14:     Act 2

March 15:     Act 3

Film Version

 While watching the film version of the play, answer the "Pause Questions" from the power points for each act:

    Act I Pause Questions

    Act II Pause Questions

    Act III Pause Questions 

Friday, March 18:

Individualism Poem Power Point Presentations

Monday, March 21: Individualism Test  

Individualism Review Power Point

Study Sheets

Individualism & Collectivism in American Poetry

Wednesday, October 5:

Flag Salute by Ester Popel

The Black American by Smokee Robinson  performance film

Skinhead by Patricia Smith  performance film

Reflection: Evaluate and Connect the poems

Thursday, October 6:

What about the Collective?

Think About It: Can a collective influence an identity?  Can a collective dream?

Freedom's Plow by Langston Hughes

Segment 1

Segment 2

Segment 3

Segment 4

Segment 5

Segment 6

Cooperative Dramatic Reading of Freedom's Plow

I Am Joaquin   MP3 English     MP3 Spanish

 Worksheet Questions

Monday, October 10th - 13th:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1.c
Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.3
Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

 Day One:

-          Present how to use accountable talk (Stem Sheet)

-          Review Tone & Metaphor

-          Before Reading portion of Worksheet (Discuss modelling Accountable Talk and students write answers)

-          Class Work Portion of Worksheet (front side)

                       - Read together and annotate I Hear America Singing by Walt Whitman  MP3

                       - Practice using Accountable Talk as a class to answer the worksheet questions

-          Reflection – Exit Pass: How can accountable talk help you stay on task and improve grades/work?

  Day Two:

   - Pairs Work Section:

                   Review I Hear America Singing by Walt Whitman and read & annotate I Hear America Screaming

  - Independent Work: I Hear America Form

   - Exit Pass: How can a change of word change the tone of a poem, as seen with the example of substituting "screaming" for "singing"?  How does this relate to connotation?  

  Day Three:

   - Group Project:

             - Each group is assigned one of the following sections of Song of Myself by Walt Whitman.

                       Poems:

                             - Song of Myself, Section 1

                             - Song of Myself, Section 6

                             - Song of Myself, Section 23

                             - Song of Myself, Section 52

                             - Song of Myself, Section 32

             - The group is responsible to read and annotate the poem.  After they have annotated the poem, they should bring it to the teacher for a screen capture so they can present it to the class.

             - Students must use Accountable Talk to discuss group questions.

             - Practice reading the poem dramatically.

   - Group Presentation of Dramatic Reading of the Poem and review with the class presenting annotations and underlying meaning notes.  Song of Myself: Group Dramatic Reading Rubric

 Day Four:

      - Group Project:

             - Each group is assigned one of the Individualism poems.

Poems:

The Psalm of Life by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow MP3

I, Too by Langston Hughes MP3

To Walt Whitman by Angela de Hoyos

Ending Poem by Aurora Levins Morales and Rosario Morales  MP3

Tia Chucha by Luis J. Rodriguez  MP3

             - The group is responsible to read and annotate the poem.

             - Students must use Accountable Talk to discuss the underlying meaning of the poem.

             - Practice reading the poem dramatically.

   - Group Presentation of Dramatic Reading of the Poem and review with the class presenting annotations and underlying meaning notes.

Roots Week Two - Roots Lesson Three & Lesson Four

Lesson Three: Roots

        ROOT                                            MEANING

1.       sub-                                       under

2.       pro-                                       for; in favor of

3.       uni-                                        one

4.       inter-                                     between; among

5.       mis-                                       wrong

6.       dis-                                         not; opposite of

7.       ob, op-                                 against

8.       ten-                                       to hold

9.       tion-*                                    state of; act of; result of

10.   logy-*                                       study of

*denotes words reviewed from the first list

Lesson Four: Challenging Words

1.       subterfuge

2.       proclivity

3.       universally

4.       interim

5.       misconstrue

6.       dissipate

7.       obstreperous

8.       tentative

9.       correlation

10.   anthropology

11.    obdurate*

12.   protagonist*

13.   etymology* (repeated from first list)

 Root & Challenging Words Quiz on Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Roots Week Three - Roots Lesson Five & Lesson Six

Lesson Five: Roots

 

        ROOT                                   MEANING

1.       able, ible                        capable of; condition of

2.       a, an                               not; without

3.       super                             above; over; beyond

4.       trans                              across; change to

5.       poly                               many

6.       ver                                 true

7.       log                                 word; talk

8.       ism                                 belief or doctrine

9.       chron                            time

10.     post                               after

Lesson Six: Challenging Words

 

  1. culpable
  2. apathy
  3. superfluous
  4. transition
  5. polychromatic
  6. veracity
  7. epilogue
  8. nepotism
  9. chronic
  10. posthumously
  11. supercilious*
  12. amoral*
  13. eulogy*

Puritan Unit Reading Schedule (Acad)

Students should be aware of the Unit Overview that was passed out for HONORS and ACADEMIC classes.  Those will be study sheets for the test at the end of the Unit.

Reading Schedule: (American Literature ACADEMIC)

October 13:        -  PRIMARY SOURCES

                               “Of Plymouth Plantation” selection by William Bradfor

                           -  Mayflower Compact

 

Questions for  Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford & The Mayflower Compact

Write your answers on notebook paper and be sure to answer the WHOLE prompt.  (Do not answer the first sentence and ignore the rest and assume you will receive credit.)  Use “A-level” TREE format with your answers.

1.       According to the journal entries and the compact, was religion an important factor for the early Massachusetts settlers?  What quotes illustrate this?  Explain.

2.       Using the information in the journal entry, do you evaluate (or judge) that first winter in Massachusetts easy for the English settlers?  Why or why not?  What information and quotes from the journal support your evaluation?  Explain.

3.       How did the relationship between the “Indians” (Native Americans) and the settlers change over time?  What caused the changes?  Explain.

 

              Secondary Document:

                               What is the Difference Between a Pilgrim and a Puritan? by Rockwell Stensrud

                                      Complete the Venn Diagram

        Questions:

 

1.       Looking back at the journal of William Bradford, there was a peace treaty made between the Native American Sachem, Massasoit, and the original Mayflower settlers.  This established a cooperative relationship between the two groups and rules were established to prevent animosity between them.  According to this article, why did the relationship between the Native American tribes and the later Puritan settlers change and become unfriendly and (eventually) violent?  (Use quotes from this article to illustrate your explanation.)

2.       Why do people get the two groups (Pilgrims vs Puritans) confused?  Explain.

 

                          

               HW: Primary Document- Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” by Jonathan Edwards  MP3

 

Questions for  Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God by Jonathan Edwards

Write your answers on notebook paper and be sure to answer the WHOLE prompt.  (Do not answer the first sentence and ignore the rest and assume you will receive credit.)  Use “A-level” format with your answers.

1.       What is Edwards’ purpose in writing this piece?  (What is he hoping will be the audience’s response as a result?  Is he trying to entertain, inform or persuade?)  What words or phrases clue you in to Edwards’ purpose?  Why are those words or phrases important?  Explain.

2.       Is it using reason (logos) to try and influence the audience or is it relying on appealing to emotions (pathos) or ethics (ethos)?  What words or phrases strongly point to Edwards’ strategy to influence his audience to fit his purpose?  Explain.

3.       What does this sermon illustrate about Puritan values?  What was important to the Puritans or what were things that concerned them?  Explain using quotes to back up your inferences.

 

October 14: 

Watch the documentary and take notes (helps to review historical and religious context of Pilgrims & Puritans)

 - Pilgrims & Puritans Documentary

             Cornell Notes Sheet for Documentary

 

 Students must copy down the board notes which reviews the following:

             - The role of women in Puritan New England

             - Important points from Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God

             - Theocracy and Puritan Law

 

Students will have an OPEN NOTE QUIZ on Monday, October 17th based on the above.

 

HW:

Anne Bradstreet poems

o   Before the Birth of One of Her Children(MP3)

o   In Reference to Her Children

o   To My Dear and Loving Husband(MP3)

o   Verses Upon the Burning of Our House(MP3)

o   Upon a Fit of Sickness

o   A Letter To Her Husband   MP3

o   In Memory of My Grandchild

 

               Anne Bradstreet Poems Worksheet Questions  (only do questions 1-6)

 

October 17:

                                Half-Hanged Mary by Margaret Atwood

                                Mary (Reeve) Webster, the “Witch” of Hadley  by Bridget M. Marshall

    Interpretive Performance of Half-Hanged Mary (video)

 

      Half-Hanged Mary & Mary Webster Article Questions

      Reflection: Half-Hanged Mary & Individualism

 

October 18:    

 Witchcraft cases in 17th Century New England by Alice Marie Beard

                     Questions Sheet

 

 Before Salem, the First American Witch Hunt by Christopher Klein                               

Haunted Stamford: 1692 witch trial by Maggie Gordon

 

October 19:    PSAT Testing

 

 

October 20:   

Think About It: Lying to Save Yourself

 

The Crucible – Act I 

                        Audio Book File

                        Comprehension Questions Act I

HW:

The Crucible – Act II

                        Audio Book File

                                The Crucible – Act II: Scene 2 (Appendix)

Comprehension Questions Act II

 

 

 October 21:

Think About It: Sacrificing to Save Someone

 

  The Crucible – Act III

                         Audio Book File

                         Comprehension Questions Act III

 

HW:          The Crucible – Act IV

                          Audio Book File

                          Comprehension Questions Act IV

 

October 24:

 Edmentum

 

October 25:

 

Think About It: Forgiveness  (Before Reading - Big Picture, Connections to Self/World)

 

   Primary vs Secondary Sources

 

Primary

The Examination of Sarah Good  (Salem Court Documents)   MP3

 Spectral Evidence Sheet

Ann Putnam’s Confession

              Worksheet w/Questions

 

 Secondary

                        Guilt by Clifford Lindsey Alderman

                         CSPAN interview regarding book on Judge Sewall's Aplogy

                                       Reflection Sheet

 

 HW Study for test on Thursday, October 27

 Study Sheets:   Power Point Review

Creative Writing "After the Witch Trials" Project and Rubric


 

                        

Review the Crucible

Act I 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwBJT77oM_0

Act II

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0EQAImb26io

Act III

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xku9SPxQ_Z4

Act IV

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6kO-Yv5NPU

 

 

 

PURITAN UNIT TEST

 

Thursday, October 27th.

 

 EXTRAS:

Documentaries

 

American History - Colonial America (Discovery America)

 

Inside the Salem Witch Trials (Documentary TV)

 

Salem Witch Trials - History Channel Documentary

 

PBS Frontline - God In America: The New Adam

 

PBS Frontline - God In America: A New Eden

 

 

The Persecution of Witches, 21st-Century Style by Mitch Horowitz

  "Elizabeth Clausen...Thou Deseruest to Dye" by Ronald Marcus

 

Roots Week Four - Roots Supplement ob-, sequi-, -ject

 ROOTS

ob

Latin: “toward” or “against” or “after” or “across from”

sequi

Latin: “follow”

ject

Latin: “throw” or “lie”

Challenging Words:

1. OBJECT – (v) to disagree

from ob "against" + ject “lie”

2. OBJECTIVE –

  1. (adj) not influenced by personal feelings or opinions in considering and representing facts
  2. (n.) a thing aimed at or sought; a goal or target

from ob "against" + ject “lie” + ive “causing or making”

3. OBLIQUE  -  (adj) indirect, evasive, misleading, devious

from ob "against" + root of licinus "bent upward,"

4. OBLIVIOUS  -  (adj) unaware, inattentive

from ob "over" + root of levis "smooth."

L. obliviosus "forgetful, producing forgetfulness,"

5. OBSESSIVE  -  (adv) preoccupying,  all-consuming

from ob "against" + sedere "to besiege”

6. OBSTINATE  -  (adj) stubborn

from ob "against" + stinare, related to stare "stand"

7. OBSEQUIOUS  -  (adj) overly submissive, brown nosing

from ob "after" + sequi "follow"

8. SEQUEL  - (n) a literary work, movie, etc., that is complete in itself but continues the narrative of a preceding work.

from sequi “follow”

9. CONSEQUENCE  – (n) the effect, result, or outcome of something occurring earlier

from con- "with" + sequi "to follow"

10. CONJECTURE – (v) to form an opinion; to surmise

from con- "with" + ject “lie” + ure “state of, act”

Quiz on Tuesday, November 1st.

Puritan Unit HONORS

Reading Schedule: (American Literature HONORS)

October 13th:  PRIMARY DOCUMENT

                    “Of Plymouth Plantation” selection by William Bradford

                        Mayflower Compact

                     SECONDARY DOCUMENT

 What is the Difference Between a Pilgrim and a Puritan? by Rockwell Stensrud

      Complete the Venn Diagram

        Questions:

1.       Looking back at the journal of William Bradford, there was a peace treaty made between the Native American Sachem, Massasoit, and the original Mayflower settlers.  This established a cooperative relationship between the two groups and rules were established to prevent animosity between them.  According to this article, why did the relationship between the Native American tribes and the later Puritan settlers change and become unfriendly and (eventually) violent?  (Use quotes from this article to illustrate your explanation.)

2.       Why do people get the two groups (Pilgrims vs Puritans) confused?  Explain.                

              HW   Primary Document: - Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” by Jonathan Edwards   MP3

Questions for  Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God by Jonathan Edwards

Write your answers on notebook paper and be sure to answer the WHOLE prompt.  (Do not answer the first sentence and ignore the rest and assume you will receive credit.)  Use “A-level” format with your answers.

1.       What is Edwards’ purpose in writing this piece?  (What is he hoping will be the audience’s response as a result?  Is he trying to entertain, inform or persuade?)  What words or phrases clue you in to Edwards’ purpose?  Why are those words or phrases important?  Explain.

2.       Is it using reason (logos) to try and influence the audience or is it relying on appealing to emotions (pathos) or ethics (ethos)?  What words or phrases strongly point to Edwards’ strategy to influence his audience to fit his purpose?  Explain.

3.       What does this sermon illustrate about Puritan values?  What was important to the Puritans or what were things that concerned them?  Explain using quotes to back up your inferences.

 

October 14th:

Watch the documentary and take notes (helps to review historical and religious context of Pilgrims & Puritans)

 - Pilgrims & Puritans Documentary

             Cornell Notes Sheet for Documentary

Courtship of Miles Standish, Part I: Miles Standish by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

                                MP3 (if you want to listen to the text)

                                Part I: Miles Standish questions

HW:  Part II: Lover and Friendship, Part III: The Lover’s Errand

 Part II: Love and Friendship & Part III: The Lover's Errand questions

October 17: Courtship of Miles Standish,  Part IV: John Alden

                                MP3 (if you want to listen to the text)

                                Part IV: John Alden questions                   

HW: Part V: The Sailing of the Mayflower& Part VI: Priscilla

 Part V: The Sailing of the Mayflower & Part VI: Priscilla questions

October 18:       Courtship of Miles Standish, Part VII: March of Miles Standish

                                MP3 (if you want to listen to the text

                                Part VII: March of Miles Standish questions

HW:  Part VIII: The Spinning Wheel & Part IX: The Wedding Day

 Part VIII: The Spinning Wheel & Part IX: The Wedding Day questions

October 20:  

Students must copy down the board notes which reviews the following:

             - The role of women in Puritan New England

             - Important points from Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God

             - Theocracy and Puritan Law

                    Anne Bradstreet poems

                  o   Before the Birth of One of Her Children(MP3)

                  o   In Reference to Her Children()

                  o   To My Dear and Loving Husband(MP3)

                  o   Verses Upon the Burning of Our House(MP3)

                  o   Upon a Fit of Sickness

                  o   A Letter To Her Husband

                  o   In Memory of My Grandchild

                  - Bradstreet Poem Questions Sheet   (Questions 1-6 only)

         Background Information on Anne Hutchinson

                  - Anne Marbury Hutchinson Bio I

                  - Anne Hutchinson Bio II

                  - Anne Hutchinson Trial (1637)

                  - To My Dear and Loving Husband  examination article by Emily Warn

                - Reflection: How does Religion influence Puritan writers' works?

HW:  Half-Hanged Mary by Margaret Atwood

                                Mary (Reeve) Webster, the “Witch” of Hadley  by Bridget M. Marshall

    Interpretive Performance of Half-Hanged Mary (video)

      Half-Hanged Mary & Mary Webster Article Questions

      Reflection: Half-Hanged Mary & Individualism

October 21: 

Think About It: Lying to Save Yourself

 Witchcraft cases in 17th Century New England by Alice Marie Beard

                     Questions Sheet

                  The Crucible – Act I 

                        Audio Book File

                        Comprehension Questions Act I

HW:  The Crucible – Act II

                  The Crucible – Act II: Scene 2 (Appendix)

                 Comprehension Questions Act II

October 24:   

Think About It: Sacrifice to Save Someone Else 

                       The Crucible – Act III   

                         Audio Book File

                         Comprehension Questions Act III

HW:  The Crucible – Act IV

                         Comprehension Questions Act IV

October 25:   

Think About It: Forgiveness  (Before Reading - Big Picture, Connections to Self/World)

Primary vs Secondary Documents

Primary

The Examination of Sarah Good  (Salem Court Documents)   MP3

Spectral Evidence Sheet

Ann Putnam’s Confession

              Worksheet w/Questions

Secondary

 Guilt by Clifford Lindsey Alderman

   Reflection Sheet

HW Study for test on Thursday, October 27

 Study Sheets:   Power Point Review

                Courtship of Miles Standish Study Notes

 TAKE HOME ESSAY!  Due Thursday, October 27


 

Puritan Unit Test Study Sheets

 Study Sheets:

HONORS

Civil War Research Project Schedule

 Research:

Week 1:

4/27/17 Choose a Topic from the List & Form a Research Group

5/1 – 5/5              Research and Discuss findings

                                Sheets Needed:

-          Potential Sources

-          TCD Checklist

-          Exploring a Topic

-          Area Evaluation Checklist

Week 2:

5/8 – 5/12            Individual Research

-          Potential Sources

-          Research Evaluation Criteria Checklist

-          Thesis proposal & Preliminary Bibliography DUE Wednesday, 5/10

                  Model APA Works Cited

Taking Notes

-          Forming Evidence-Based Claims Models & Sheets 1, 2 & 3

-   First Draft Due Friday, 5/12

         Model of Draft

Week 3:

5/15 – 5/19        

Organizing Notes & Writing Draft

-          Evidence-Based Perspective

-          Synthesizing Evidence-Based Claims

-          Second Draft               (due Friday, 5/19)

Week 4:

5/22-5/24            Conferencing on Drafts w/Peers & Teacher

5/31 Final Draft Due

 

   Civil War Outline Template

   Civil War Outline Template Model

          Final Draft Model

Civil War - Literature Reflecting the History

December 5:

Opening: What do you KNOW about the American Civil War?

Civil War Through Pictures, Maps, Charts & Graphs Power Point

         Group Work: North vs South Advantages

         Group Reflection: Civil War Resource Advantages

Civil War Desertion Rates

Reflection: What have you learned?

December 6:

Think About It: Views on Death

Death & Civil War Documentary

Reflection on Documentary

What constituted a "good death" during the period leading up to the Civil War, as seen in the documentary?

How did soldiers try to maintain this concept of a "good death" in the face of uncertainty?

December 8:

Think About It: Issue in America Today

Review info about why Walt Whitman became involved in the Civil War Hospitals

Walt Whitman

 - Why did Walt Whitman become involved as a Civil War nurse for the Union?

     Info from Traveling with the Wounded

o   The Great Army of the Sick     MP3

   Questions for Great Army of the Sick

§  Wound Dresser   MP3   MP3 (The Wound Dresser begins as 17:46)

     Analysis Exercise

Homework:

- Read The Million Dead, Too, Summed Up

          Ashes of Soldiers

 Reflection Questions:

1. Based on his poetry and prose, what do you think is Whitman’s feeling about the war?  Does he feel it was worth it?  Why or why not?  What words or phrases key you in to this?  Explain.

2. Does he feel that the living and the government has a responsibility to the dead and wounded soldiers?  Why or why not?  Explain.

Extra Info: George Washington Whitman article

Extra Literature:

§  Over the Carnage a Prophetic Voice   MP3

§  Drum-Taps   MP3 - Part 1  MP3 - Part 2   MP3 - Part 3  MP3 - Part 4   MP3 - Part 5  MP3 - Part 6

§  To a Certain Civilian  

§  A Vigil Strange I Kept on the Field One Night    MP3

Non-fiction (reflections)

o   Memoranda During the War      

Walt Whitman, in Great Army of the Sick, makes mention that the nurse, "in Ward E is one of the best".

The nurse's name was Amanda Akin Stearns.

She wrote a journal of her experiences and it can be accessed here: 

The Lady Nurse of Ward E

Extra:

o   On Picket Duty

o   Hospital Sketches          MP3   

December 9:

Connecting Civil War Nursing to Today's Nursing

Think About It: Hospitals

Pairs Work: What About Nurses?

Class Viewing: Day in the Life of a Nurse from Johnson & Johnson 

   Recommended:

    - Laurie (Emergency Nurse)

    - Ed (Hospice Nurse)

    - Tanisha (Oncology Nurse)

    - Stephane (Pediatric Nurse)

    - Romel (Staff Nurse)

    - Carmen (Peri-Operative Nurse)

Pairs Work Reflection: What About Nurses? Part 2

HW:

Readings:

Historical Fiction  

The Drummer Boy of Shiloh by Ray Bradbury

Fiction Based on the Experience of the Writer: Louisa May Alcott

My Contraband

Non-fiction Primary Source

 Civil War Journal Entries

Students must complete the two circled questions at the end of the journal entries:

- When war is declared, how do the people of Concord respond?  What are the important details/quotes from the journals that illustrate their response?  Explain.

- Reread lines 65-73.  Which of John Suhre's qualities does Alcott find most notable?  Tell what you learn about her values from her opinions about this soldier.  Explain your inferred connections.

Reflection: complete the "Read for Information: Draw a Conclusion" assignment using the day's readings.

- Synthesize historical details from The Drummer Boy of Shiloh, My Contraband and Alcott's journal and draw a conclusion (a judgement or belief) about either: a.) being a nurse in a military hospital during the American Civil War, b.) American Civil War Hospitals or c.) the lives and experiences of American Civil War soldiers.

Follow the steps laid out in the packet at the end of Louisa May Alcott's journal section.  

December 12:

Think About It  Fighting Against Family

Horseman in the Sky by Ambrose Bierce   text  MP3

  Answer the following questions in three to five sentences each on white-lined paper:
  1. Who was the horseman and what happened to him?  Even if the Carter Druse did not directly shoot the horseman, is he responsible for the horseman’s death?  Why or why not? Explain.
  2. If you were in Carter Druse’s position, would you have been able to make the same decision?  Why or why not?  Explain.
  3. What point is Ambrose Bierce trying to make about the realities of war through this story?  Do you agree with his assessment?  Explain.
  4. What was your personal reaction to the ending?  Why did the story make you feel the way it did?  Were you surprised by the ending?  Why or why not?  Explain.

The Affair at Coulter's Notch by Ambrose Bierce  text  MP3

Answer each the following questions in three to five sentences on a separate sheet of paper:

1.       What happened to Captain Coulter’s family?  Why did it happen to them?  Explain.

2.       Do you infer that Captain Coulter was directly responsible or do you think he did not have a choice?  Why or why not?  Explain.

3.       Should a person follow orders if innocent people will be hurt or should they consider the “greater good” and whether it outweighs the lives of the innocent?  Explain.

Chickamauga by Ambrose Bierce text MP3

Answer each the following questions in three to five sentences on a separate sheet of paper:

1.       Does the child understand what he is seeing?  Why or why not?  Explain.

2.       What does the ending reveal about what has occurred as a result of the battle?  Explain.

 Reflection: What do these stories reveal about the realities of war?  Explain.

 EXTRA 

Film version of Chickamauga

December 13: 

Think About It: What does it mean to be brave?  Who is the bravest person you know and why do you think that person is brave?

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge  MP3 by Ambrose Bierce

Answer

the following questions in three to five sentences each on white-lined paper:

  1. Did you like the ending of this story, or dislike it? Why or why not?
  1. How did the ending change the way you interpreted events in the story?
  1. Why do you think Peyton Farquhar has the last thoughts he does before he dies?
  1. What is the Union soldiers’ reason for hanging Farquhar?  Cite evidence from section II to support your view.

A Mystery of Heroism MP3 by Stephen Crane

Answer the following questions in three to five sentences each on white-lined paper:

  1. Why do you think Fred Collins is not mentioned in the last paragraphs of this story?  Explain your answer.
  1. How would you explain what Collins learns from his brush with death?
  1. Do you consider Collins a hero?  Cite evidence to support your answer.

             Consider: 

    1. the risks he takes and why he takes them
    2. his emotions in the heat of battle’
    3. how he treats the dying artillery officer
  1. If Collins had been killed, how would the effect of this story be different?
  1. Which character do you think shows more courage, Collins in Crane’s story or Peyton Farquhar in An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge?  Explain the reasons from your choice. (1 handwritten page)

 Homework:

War Is Kind by Stephen Crane  MP3

   Analysis Exercise for War is Kind

 EXTRA:

Film of Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge (Twilight Zone)

Film of Mystery of Heroism

December 14:

 Think About It: Music Connection

Civil War Prison Camps

    Civil War Song: Starved in Prison

Sullivan Ballou Letter

    Civil War Song: Just Before the Battle, Mother

    Civil War Song: Touch Not My Sister's Picture

Analysis Exercise Civil War Prison Camps

Evaluation Exercise Civil War Men Before Battle

December 15:

The Gettysburg Address   MP3  (Info in 4 Minutes)

   Article

   Dramatic Reading of Gettysburg Address from "Saving Lincoln"

Walt Whitman on Abraham Lincoln

§  O Captain, My Captain           MP3 

The following youtube reading of "O Captain, My Captain" is better in tone than the above MP3:

Tribute to Robin Williams - O Captain, My Captain Dramatic Reading

    Analysis Exercise: The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln

    Analysis Exercise: O Captain, My Captain! by Walt Whitman

Extras:

   Dead Poet's Society - Mr. Keating's Walt Whitman Speech

   O Captain, My Captain - Mr. Keating's Departure

December 16:

Short Fiction

The War Prayer by Mark Twain (short story) reading video

   Questions Sheet

Closer Reading of the Prayer from The War Prayer:

Oh Lord, Our Father by Mark Twain  reading video

   Analysis Exercise for Oh Lord, Our Father

Mark Twain was a Civil War Deserter

- Mark Twain's Civil War Experience (article) 

- Why Mark Twain Deserted (speech given at Union Veterans Association of Maryland Banquet, Baltimore, April 8, 1887)

    - alternate text

 -  A Private History of a Campaign that Failed      MP3

Mark Twain Reflection Sheet

Civil War Research Project Topics

Civil War Hospitals

1.       Walt Whitman

-          What did he do during the Civil War? 

-          What were his beliefs and attitudes?

-          What were the conditions?

-          How did it influence his writing?

o   Civil War Poetry

§  Wound Dresser   MP3

§  Over the Carnage a Prophetic Voice   MP3

§  Reconciliation   MP3

§  To a Certain Civilian  

§  A Vigil Strange I Kept on the Field One Night    MP3

§  O Captain, My Captain           MP3

§  Drum-Taps   MP3 - Part 1  MP3 - Part 2   MP3 - Part 3  MP3 - Part 4   MP3 - Part 5  MP3 - Part 6

Non-fiction (reflections)

o   Memoranda During the War       \

o   The Great Army of the Sick     MP3

2.       Louisa May Alcott

-          What did she do during the Civil War?

-          What were her beliefs and attitudes?

-          What were the conditions?

-          How did it influence her writing?

Civil War Journal Entries

o   Hospital Sketches          MP3

o   My Contraband

o   On Picket Duty

o   Work, Ch. 16: Mustered In

o   Work, Ch. 17: The Colonel

-          How did her writing influence others?

Abolition Movement

3.       Frances Ellen Watkins Harper

-          How did she influence the abolition movement?

-          What were her experiences?

-          How did it influence her writing?

o   Poem: Free Labor    MP3

o   Bible Defense of Slavery

o   Learning to Read

o   Other Poems

o   Speech: A Heritage of Scorn

o   Speech: We are All Bound Up Together

4.       James Russell Lowell

-          How did he influence the abolition movement?

-          What were his experiences?

-          How did it influence his writing?

Poems: Stanzas on Freedom   MP3

           Slaves

           Of the Dawn of Freedom

           Are Ye Truly Free?

           The Present Crisis

           On the Capture of Fugitive Slaves Near Washington

4. Maria W. Stewart

-          How did she influence the abolition movement?

-          What were her experiences?

-          How did it influence her writing?

o   Why Sit Ye Here and Die?

o   Productions of Mrs. Maria W. Stewart            MP3

o   The Negro’s Complaint

5.      Frederick Douglass

-          How did he influence the abolition movement?

-          What were his experiences?

-          How did it influence his writing?

o   Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave           MP3

o   My Bondage and My Freedom

·  Letter from Frederick Douglass to To William A. White, July 30, 1846

·  Letter from Frederick Douglass to William Lloyd Garrison April 16, 1846

·  Letter from Frederick Douglass to William Lloyd Garrison, February 26, 1846

·  "My Opposition to War: An Address Delivered in London, England, on May 19, 1846."

·  "The Skin Aristocracy in America: An Address Delivered in Coventry, England, February 2, 1847"

·  "Our Paper and Its Prospects" The North Star, December 3, 1847

·  "The Cambria Riot, My Slave Experience, and My Irish Mission: An Address Delivered in Belfast, Ireland, on December 5, 1845"

·  Speech of Wendell Phillips. "Proceedings of the American-Anti-Slavery Society at its second decade." New York, 1854. Twelfth Anniversary of the American Anti-Slavery Society

·  A Simple Tale of American Slavery: An Address Delivered in Sheffield, England, on September 11, 1846

·  Letter from Frederick Douglass to Francis Jackson, January 29, 1846

·  A Few Facts and Personal Observations of Slavery: An Address Delivered in Ayr, Scotland on March 24, 1846

·  American Prejudice Against Color: An Address Delivered in Cork, Ireland, October 23, 1845.

·  Letter from Frederick Douglass to Henry C. Wright December 22, 1846

-          How did his writing influence the Civil War and others?

Reflections on Slavery & the Civil War

7.       Herman Melville

-          Benito Cereno  MP3  & the memoir of Captain Amasa Delano

-          How does it relate/compare to other slave uprisings?

o   The Amistad Revolt

o   Nat Turner Rebellion

o   John Brown

-          How does the story go against what was believed of slaves during that time?

-          How does this relate to what happens during the American Civil War?

-          What does Melville feel about the Civil War?

o   Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War   MP3

8.       Mark Twain

-          What were Twain’s experiences during the Civil War?

-          How did his views on slavery and the South influence his writing?

o   A True Story Repeated Word for Word   MP3

A Private History of a Campaign that Failed      MP3

- Why Mark Twain Deserted (speech given at Union Veterans Association of Maryland Banquet, Baltimore, April 8, 1887)

    - alternate text

Reflections on the Civil War

9.       Ambrose Bierce

-          What were his experiences during the Civil War?

-          How did it influence his writing?

o   Short stories  &  Non-fiction pieces

-          What were common themes in his Civil War stories?

10.   Stephen Crane

-          What were common themes in his Civil War stories?

-          What were his experiences during the Civil War?

-          How did it influence his writing?

o   Red Badge of Courage           MP3

o   Short Stories

§  The Veteran   MP3

§  A Mystery of Heroism   MP3

§  The End of the Battle  MP3

o   Poem: War Is Kind   MP3

 

Thesis Proposal Letter Outline

The American Gothic

 

 October 31 - November 1st:

American Gothic Literature:

During the 1800s in America, while Romantic writers focused on the beauties of nature and the positive elements of human freedom (such as in Transcendentalism), some writers focused on the dark side of human nature with all of its potential for anxiety and evil.  

Refer to Elements of American Gothic Fiction on Lit Devices Applied Page

Washington Irving

The Devil and Tom Walker   (audio)    MP3

           The Devil and Tom Walker American Gothic Elements Sheet

   

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (abridged)  (audio)

           The Legend of Sleepy Hollow American Gothic Elements Sheet

       Comprehension Questions

       Reflection: Was there really a "headless horseman"? 

 Orchestral Tone Poem for Sleepy Hollow

November 2nd - 3rd:

Think About It: Symbols of Death

Edgar Allan Poe Documentary

    - Cornell Notes

HW: Masque of the Red Death text   MP3

Film Part One

Film Part Two

  - Comprehension Questions

  -  Essay Assignment

           - Rough Draft Check on Friday, November 4th

           - Final Draft Due (Typed) on Wednesday, November 9th

November 4th:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.5
Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

-          Think About It: Secrets

            House of Usher Slides Activity 

-          Fall of the House of Usher text  MP3 Animated Film version

o   Gothic Elements Recording Chart

o   Comprehension Questions

-          Reflection Evaluation (pg 2): Is it scary?  What does it say about how audience psyche evolves over time?

Homework:

 Essay Assignment

- Finish Rough Draft for a check on Monday.

- Final Draft Due (Typed) on Wednesday, November 9th

 

 November 9th:

        Young Goodman Brown  by Nathaniel Hawthorne  MP3   audio 2

                          Young Goodman Brown Questions

                          Joseph Moody, The Colonial Minister Who Wore a Handkercheif Over His Face

 HW: Finish reading the story and answering the questions.

Finish the reading & the Comprehension Questions for Young Goodman Brown

 November 10 - November 14:

 The Minister’s Black Veil   MP3

The Minister's Black Veil Questions Sheet  (third and fourth page of the document)

HW: Read and annotate The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne  Ch. 1-4  MP3 Page

  Create Indirect Characterization Charts for Hester Prynne, Roger Chillingworth, Arthur Dimmsdale & Pearl

    Indirect Characterization Chart

November 15:        

Homework:

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne  Ch. 5-8

                                MP3 Page                         

November 16:     

1. Shame Definition: 

- a painful feeling of humiliation or distress caused by the consciousness of wrong or foolish behavior.

-        a source of internal conflict

-        can cause mental, as well as physical, issues in the individual struggling with the emotion

What can be some sources of shame for people?

2.  Puritan Shame Punishments Power Point

3.  First Film of the Scarlet Letter (Show Clip of Scenes Corresponding With Ch. 1-2, Illustrating Shame Punishment)

4.

Thief Challenges Does of Shame Punishment article

Thief Challenges Dose of Shame Punishment questions

  OR

Is Public Shaming Fair Punishment? article

Reflection: Public Shaming Fair?       

5. Class Review (Reading Guides for Ch 1-9 or Power Points)

                                 Scarlet Letter Close Reading Power Point 1

                                Scarlet Letter Close Reading Power Point 2

 

HW: The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne  Ch. 9 - 13           MP3 Page

 

November 17:  

Think About It: Double Standard     

A Double Standard by Ellen Watkins Harper  film

Double Standard Questions

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne  Ch. 14 – 17

                                MP3 Page

                                Scarlet Letter Close Reading Power Point 3                         

 Reflection: Double Standard

November 18:       

1. Lyrics: “Does Anybody Hear Her” & “Stained Glass Masquerade”

                             Song Connections Questions

                            The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne  Ch. 18 - 19

                             MP3 Page

                                Scarlet Letter Close Reading Power Point 4

                             Predictions and Dilemmas Sheet

November 21:              The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne  Ch. 20-24

                                MP3 Page

 

December 2:
Test

American Dream, Roaring Twenties, The Great Gatsby, The Depression, Of Mice and Men and Streetcar Named Desire - Academic & Honors

December 19:

Think About It: What does the Statue of Liberty symbolize for you?  Explain.

       The American Dream vs. The American Ideal Definitions

      Parody vs Satire

           The New Colossus by Emma Lazarus MP3 A   MP3 B  MP3 C  MP3 D

                Mocking the American Ideal and the American Dream Sheet

    Look at the following political cartoons or Statue of Liberty images and explain how they change the Statue of Liberty's intended meaning or create an ironic skew to the Statue of Liberty's meaning.

                  Image 1

                  Image 2

                  Image 3

                  Image 4

                  Image 5

                 Image 6

                  Image 7

                  Image 8

                  Image 9

                  Image 10

                  Image 11

                  Image 12

                  Image 13

                  Image 14

             The New Colossus Song Video

             Statue of Liberty Documentary

   

The Great Gatsby Reading Schedule

While students read The Great Gatsby, they are expected to fill out the character sheets for the main characters in the story, connecting them to the concepts of "individualism", "collectivism" and "The American Dream"

(A-Level Character Sheet Model

          Gatsby Character Sheet

              Gatsby Indirect Character Sheet

          Nick Character Sheet

              Nick Indirect Character Sheet 

          Daisy Character Sheet

                Daisy Indirect Character Sheet

          Tom Character Sheet

                Tom Indirect Character Sheet

          Myrtle Character Sheet

                Myrtle Indirect Character Sheet

          Jordan Character Sheet

                 Jordan Indirect Character Sheet

Monday, December 19:

The Great Gatsby Ch. 1    MP3 Ch 1

Tuesday, December 20

The Great Gatsby Ch. 2-3   MP3 Ch 2   MP3  Ch 3

Wednesday, December 21

The Great Gatsby Ch. 4-5    MP3 Ch 4    MP3 Ch 5

Thursday, December 22

The Great Gatsby Ch. 6-7    MP3 Ch 6     MP3 Ch 7

Friday, December 23:

The Great Gatsby Ch. 8-9        MP3 Ch 8   MP3 Ch 9

 

December 20:

Roots - Lesson 12 Ex III

Think About It : Don't Criticize

Warring and Roaring: America in the 1920s Documentary

   Cornell Notes Sheet

 HW:

A. Read  The Great Gatsby Ch. 2-3   MP3 Ch 2   MP3  Ch 3

B. Work on the Indirect Characterization Sheet

 

December 21:

 Think About It Sheets - Is the American Dream Attainable?

Read the articles:

  Many Feel the American Dream is Out of Reach

  Is the American Dream Attainable?

 Reflection: Is the American Dream Attainable?

 HW:

A.  Read The Great Gatsby Ch. 4-5    MP3 Ch 4    MP3 Ch 5

B. Work on Indirect Characterization Sheets

C. Study for Roots Quiz

 

December 22 - 23

 

In-Class Creative Project 

Creating a Graphic Novel 

Choose the most important scenes in your view and tell the story of The Great Gatsby for each Chapter Section. The quality of your project will be determined by the following: the extent to which your graphic novel includes the key points of the novel, the quality/effort put into the artwork, and your ability to summarize through images and key quotes will be noted. 

Not only will you receive a grade for the finished product, you will receive a grade for actively working on the project in class.  You will have both Thursday (Dec 22) and Friday (Dec 23) to work on this project.  If you do not actively use class time (avoiding goofing around and talking) there will be NO EXTENSIONS given.

YOU MUST FOLLOW ALL POINTS OF THE RUBRIC TO RECEIVE CREDIT AND SUMMARIZE THE TEXT IN THE SPACE PROVIDED USING PICTURES.  (It is okay if you are not a fabulous artist, just do your best to draw what you can.  Stick figures are okay, as long as you make it colorful and the text detailed.)

This project has the potential to bring up your grade significantly if you are doing poorly since you are being given two class periods to work on it.

 Project Assignment Sheet & Rubric

Graphic Novel Frame Sheets

  Ch 1-2

  Ch 3-5

 

HONORS STUDENTS HAVE AN ALTERNATE ESSAY OPTION THAT THEY CAN DO IN PLACE OF THE GRAPHIC NOVEL

 

Essay in Three Parts

A.        How do the ideas of money and greed tie into the novel? Explain how new money and old money relate to the characters and their environment. 

B.        What role does hypocrisy and appearances play in the novel?  How does it affect the reader and how the reader sees the characters within the novel – such as Tom, Daisy and Gatsby?  Why are these details included within the novel?  How does it reflect the society and belief systems of the time period during “The Roaring 20s?”  Explain.

C.        How do all of these things shape the characters and whether the characters are likeable to the audience?  Explain.

THE ESSAY SHOULD BE THREE PAGES, HAND-WRITTEN AND WILL BE DUE AT THE END OF CLASS ON FRIDAY, DEC. 23.

 

In Class Work

January 3rd -

 Winter Dreams    MP3   MP3B

      Questions

      Compare and Contrast to Gatsby & Daisy

January 4th - 

   The Ice Palace        MP3 Part 1   MP3 Part 2   MP3 Part 3   MP3 Part 4   MP3 Part 5   MP3 Part 6

      The Ice Palace Questions

Compare & Contrast Winter Dreams & Ice Palace 

January 5th -

OF MICE AND MEN reading   Text here

 Read Ch. 1 & 2  MP3 Ch 1   MP3 Ch 2

 Work on Character Sheets:

     Character Sheet: Lenny

     Character Sheet: George

Character Sheet: Georgeb

Character Sheet: Lennieb

        Indirect Characterization George

        Indirect Characterization Lennie 

TREE Graphic Organizer Model (Tom's Control)

TREE Graphic Organizer Sheet 

Reflection: Should George feel responsible for Lenny?

 HW: Read Of Mice & Men Ch 3 Text   MP3 Ch 3

Take Home Quiz


EXTRA F. Scott Fitzgerald Works

Babylon Revisited         MP3

      Babylon Revisited Questions

F. Scott Fitzgerald Poetry

    City Dusk

    Amory to Eleanor "Summer Storm"

    Eleanor to Amory

    Rain Before Dawn

    We Leave Tonight

F. Scott Fitzgerald Poetry Essay Choices

  or 

Analysis Exercise for Amory & Eleanor

 

Week of January 9th - 12th:

Monday, January 9th:

Common Core:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5
Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

 

1. Think About It: Who decides what a literary work means?

2. Hemingway's Iceberg Method

3. Hemingway's Six-Word Short Story

"For sale: baby shoes, never used."

 Answer the following:

- Is this a story?  (If yes, what makes it a story?  If no, why isn’t it a story?)

- What is your interpretation of this sentence?

- What makes this statement powerful?  (Move beyond what is literally being said and consider what is being implied.  How is what is being said relate to what is not being said and therefore up to the reader?)

Activity 1: Write a six word story.

Using Hemingway’s version of a six word story as a model, try and come up with a six word story.  The point of the exercise is to carefully choose a limited number of words and combine them to tell a story.  The class will work together to evaluate the six word stories of each student and help identify what makes them effective or what needs to happen in order to make them effective.  The idea is to practice constructive criticism and make suggestions in order to help one another to improve, as well as recognizing the power of words to make a statement that causes people to think or inspire the imagination.

4. Read the "Very Short Stories"

      - Which two are the best?  Explain why in three sentences each.

5. Think About It: Capturing Important People/Events in Six-Words

6. Six-Word Momoire article

After reading the article, answer the following on a white-lined sheet of paper (answers must be five to seven sentences each, with the exception of question four which must be written in PARAGRAPHS):

    1.      Which “Momoir” did you find to be the funniest and why?  Explain.

    2.      Which “Momoir” did you find to be the saddest and why?  Explain.

    3.      Which “Momoir” do you think connects to how you see your own mother and why?  Explain.

AND the following, which will be treated as a formal writing assignment (graded like a creative essay – so make sure it is well written)

    4.      Of the “Momoirs” from “And moms we’d like to know more about…”, take one of them and write what you imagine that mother’s story is in five paragraphs based on what you saw in the statement.  You can write it like a creative story, putting yourself in the narrative position of the son or daughter or from the perspective of the mother.

HW:  Complete any classwork that is not finished.

  - Read Of Mice & Men  Ch. 4 & 5

      Text   MP3 Ch 4    MP3 Ch 5 

Tuesday, January 10th:

Common Core:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5
Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.7
Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden's "Musée des Beaux Arts" and Breughel's Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

 1. Think About It:

 2. Read Hills Like White Elephants

               MP3

3. Film Version 1

     Film Version 2

  - Cornell Notes

4. Group Discussion 

 5. Creative Synthesis Activity

6. Reflection

HW: Read Of Mice & Men  Ch  6  Text     MP3 Ch 6

 Crash Course History - The Great Depression

Cornell Sheet

Wednesday, January 11:

1. Think About It:

2. Of Mice & Men Power Point

3. Read Told In the Drooling Ward

        MP3

4. Answer the questions.

5. Reflection

HW:

Streetcar Named Desire   TEXT   Scenes 1-3

Thursday, January 12:

Streetcar Named Desire    TEXT   Scenes 4-6


Friday, January 13:

Streetcar Named Desire   TEXT   Scenes 7-9

 Films of Stage Version  Part 1    Part 2    Part 3   Part 4

 

Tuesday, January 17th 

Review of The Great Gatsby, Of Mice and Men & Streetcar Named Desire

Review the "Crash Course English Literature" Films for The Great Gatsby

       Crash Course Literature: The Great Gatsby Part 1

       Crash Course Literature: The Great Gatsby Part 2

       Roaring 20's Crash Course History Review Film

Cornell Sheet: Crash Course Gatsby

Start reviewing for the final exam by going over the power point notes:

Gatsby Power Point 1

Gatsby Power Point 2

Gatsby Power Point 3

Gatsby Power Point 4

   Documentaries:

       BBC Sincerely F Scott Fitzgerald

       F Scott Fitzgerald "The American Dreamer"

Review Of Mice and Men

     Of Mice and Men 1939 Film 

     Of Mice and Men Context & Background Review

    Crash Course History - The Great Depression

      Cornell Sheet

    

   

Reading Schedule for Native American Literature Uni

When reading any text for class, you must write TWELVE annotations following the format established in class.

When answering questions on ANY text for class, you need to follow A-Level Format.

February 9, 2016

World on a Turtle's Back       TEXT     MP3

February 10, 2016

Coyote & Buffalo                  TEXT    MP3

Fox, Coyote & Whale                 MP3

February 11, 2016

Coyote and the Source of Death Variants    TEXT

Skunk Outwits Coyote

February 12, 2016

High Horse's Courting       MP3

Deer Woman

February 17, 2016

Song of the Sky Loom     MP3

Hunting Song (Navajo)     MP3

February 18th, 2015

Native American Chants

Native American Code of Ethics and Values

February 19th

Appeals: Logos, Ethos, Pathos, Kairos Information Sheet

Lecture to a Missionary  MP3

Man to Send Rainclouds    MP3

February 22:

Think About It: How have your family, your culture and your traditions shaped who you are as a person?  Explain.  Answer in ten to fifteen sentences.

(If the answer is, "not at all" then you must do the alternate assignment question: What things influence you and the person you are becoming?  What concepts or philosophies do you value and why?  Explain.)

selections from The Way to Rainy Mountain by N. Scott Momaday  MP3

Questions:

1.) What are your impressions of Momaday's grandmother Aho?  Describe her in a few words or phrases.

2.) How would you characterize Momaday's relationship with his grandmother?  Use quotes from the text and explain how they connect to your interpretation and what they illustrate about the relationship.

3.) What do you think is the most important insight that Momaday gains during his pilgrimage from Yellowstone to his grandmother's grave at Rainy Mountain?  Explain your response.

4.) A symbol is a person, place or object that has a concrete meaning in itself and also stands for something beyond itself, such as an idea or a feeling.  What might the cricket mentioned at the end of this selection symbolize for Momaday?  Explain some possible interpretations.

selections from Blue Highways by William Least Heat-Moon  MP3

Questions:

1.) What is your opinion of the Hopi Way?  For example, what ways would be easy for you to follow and what ways would be difficult?  Why?  Explain.

2.) Fritz says, "It's hard to be Hopi anywhere."  What do you think makes it difficult to be a Hopi?

         Take into consideration:

           - how most whites view Native Americans

           - how some Native Americans view others for "acting like Anglos"  (or "acting too white")

           - how the Hopi and other Native Americans have historically been treated

3.) The author mentions his grandfather's statement that "the Big Vision made the Indian, but the white man invented him."  How would you explain this distinction?

4.) At the end of the selection, the author tells Fritz that it is difficult to carry his Hopi heritage "into a world as technological as medicine is."  How successful do you think Fritz will be in remaining true to the Hopi Way as a doctor?  Why do you believe this?  Explain your point-of-view, connecting it to quotes from the text that lead you to your conclusions.

5.) How would you compare the Hopi experience with that of other minority groups in the United States?  What makes the experiences similar?  Explain using quotes about the Hopi experience to back up your conclusions.

6.) How does William Least Heat Moon's journey compare with the one that N. Scott Momaday takes?  How do their insights compare and contrast?  Explain.

extra selection:

Segment from Blue Highways

NY Times synopsis review

Interview with William Least Heat-Moon

Quiz

February 23

Navajo Night Chant

Analysis Exercise: House Made of Dawn

Modern Native American Poetry

Modern Native American Poetry worksheets

Analysis Exercise: In 1864

NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE UNIT TEST ON Monday, February 29.

Study Sheet

American Poetry Crime Scene Detectives

January 25: Richard Cory MP3

Treating Poems Like a Crime Scene = Crime Scene Thinking Process

January 26    Read and Annotate Reuben Bright by Edwin Arlington Robinson

January 27    Do the Reuben Bright Analysis Exercise

Apply the Show and Tell Technique once in your analysis.

January 28   Read and Annotate Mr. Flood's Party by Edwin Arlington Robinson

Do the Mr. Flood's Party Analysis Exercise

Apply the Show and Tell Technique twice in your analysis.

"Can I get an "A"-MEN?" Power Point - Writing Tips for an A on Analysis Exercises.

January 29 Read and Annotate Luke Havergal by Edwin Arlington Robinson.

February 1 Read and Annotate Miniver Cheevy by Edwin Arlington Robinson.   MP3

Do the Miniver Cheevy Analysis Exercise.

February 2  Luke Havergal Analysis Exercise.

Review Reuben Bright Power Point  (copy without annotations)

Review Luke Havergal Power Point   (copy without annotations)

Review Literary Analysis Rubric

February 3 Read and annotate Lisette and Eileen by Edwin Arlington Robinson.

Complete Lisette & Eileen Analysis Exercise

February 4:

The class is divided into four groups and each group is assigned one of the following    poems: 

          Madam's Past History by Langston Hughes

          Madam and the Rent Man by Langston Hughes

          Madam and the Phone Bill by Langston Hughes

          The Negro Mother by Langston Hughes

Each person will read and annotate the poem individually to get a handle on it BEFORE working with the group.

The group will then (using the previous review Power Points as models) create a power point breaking down the prompts, identifying the literary devices they need to know and breaking down the poems by stanza before noting the necessary information needed to write GOOD analysis and evaluation exercises.

The groups will turn in their power points electronically so that the teacher can print copies for the rest of the class.

They will present their power points in class on Monday, February 8th.

Group Analysis & Evaluation Langston Hughes Power Point Presentation Project

Each student will write an analysis exercise and an evaluation exercise response independently for homework based on the poem from the group work assignment.  It will be turned in on Monday, February 8th.

Victorian Women Unit

May 3 - May 4:

Think About It: Role of Women

                                Ain’t I a Woman? By Sojourner Truth  Dramatic Reading

                                Selection from Woman in theNineteenth Century by Margaret Fuller MP3 (from 23:18-27:34)

                                The Destructive Male by Elizabeth Cady Stanton  dramatic reading film  

                                Woman’s Right to the Suffrage by Susan B. Anthony MP3

               In-Class Essay: Which is the most powerful/persuasive

May 5:

          Think About It 1

            Think About It 2

            Victorian Poets

Emily Dickinson

Readings

-          Heart We Will Forget Him

-          I Envy Seas

-          I Cannot Live With You

-          She Rose to His Requirement

-          I Gave Myself

-          No Rack Can Torture Me

Independent Work Based on Group Reading:

     Analysis Exercise

Homework:

Read The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkin's Gilman  MP3

  Questions Sheet

  Charlotte Perkin's Gilman "Why I Wrote the Yellow Wallpaper"

  Think About It

May 9:

   Issues of the Victorian Era that are reflected in the Literature

     - Emotional Repression

            - Showing emotion is seen as a weakness.

            - As a result, since people do not feel free to express their emotions, they bottle them up.

            - Bottling up one's emotions leads to depression or an emotional break down.

     - Double Standards

            - Men are not held to the same standards as women in regards to fidelity or romantic/physical relationships.

            - Though improved, the double standard still exists today.

Marietta Holley

Group Readings

-          The Coquette

-          The Wages of Sin

-          Wild Oats

-          Autumn

-          Magdalena

Independent Work Based on Group Reading:  

    Analysis Exercise

Independent Work

The Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin MP3

   Questions

Review Key Quotes for Victorian Era after reading The Story of an Hour

Homework:                        The Revolt of Mother by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman MP3 (scroll down to bottom)

                                          Revolt of Mother Questions                      

May 10: 

    Issues of the Victorian Era that are reflected in the Literature

           -   Dealing with Repression (continued)

There were outlets for people to deal with their emotions, rather than repress them: MUSIC.

Concerts, playing instruments and (eventually, after 1877) listening to phonographs were very popular. 

Listening to music helped people to express or soothe emotions.

Catharsis (important to Victorian audiences)

When the audience experiences strong feelings or empathy during a play, they relate to the characters.  In the case of tragedies, on experiencing the downfall of the main character, the audience may be moved to pity or experience tears.  In the process of watching the play, the audience purges negative emotions and feels relief afterwards.  This purging of negative emotions that brings emotional relief to the audience is called, “catharsis”.

           - Appearances  (Manners/Behavior & Dress)

                    - Concerns over how you appeared or maintained appearances lead to social judgment.

                    - If deemed unacceptable, a person could be isolated or shunned by society.

           - Financial Standing

                    - Financial Standing was very important, the wealthier you were, the more important you were.

                    - Failure to maintain financial standing could cause one to be isolated or shunned by society.

         - Both of the areas above were sources of pride.  To fail in either of these areas was socially destructive.

         - Failure to maintain appearances or finances caused extra pressure, which added to the already strained emotions and emotional repression that individuals already faced.

                A Wagner Matinee by Willa Cather MP3   MP3

                                A Wagner Matinee Questions

        Best of Wagner Music (play in background to familiarize students with the music)

        Illustrate that students are familiar with Wagner's music by playing this: Ride of the Valkyries

 HW:             The Yates Pride by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman MP3

                                          Yates Pride Questions

 (Influenced by Victorian Writers)

                     A Rose for Emily by Faulkner  MP3

                     Rose for Emily Questions

May 11th:

Review important points from the class readings:

 Reflections of the Victorian Era

Reading Schedule May 11 - May 17

Towards the end and after the Victorian Era, women sought to assert their independence and individualism.  This type of woman is most clearly seen in the character of Janie from Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston.

 Their Eyes Were Watching God

                     May 11: Ch. 1-4   Ch 1 MP3   Ch 2A MP3  CH 2B MP3 Ch 3 MP3   Ch 4 MP3

                     May 12: Ch. 5-8   Ch5A MP3  Ch5B MP3   Ch6A MP3  Ch6B MP3  Ch6C MP3  Ch6D MP3  Ch 7MP3  Ch 8 MP3

                     May 13: Ch. 9-12  Ch9 MP3  Ch10 MP3  Ch11 MP3  Ch12 MP3

                     May 16: Ch. 13-16  Ch13 MP3  Ch14 MP3  Ch15 & 16 MP3 

                     May 17: Ch. 17-20 Ch17 MP3  Ch18 MP3  Ch19 MP3  Ch20 MP3

Character Sheets Due May 19th

       Character Sheet: Janie

       Character Sheet: Nanny

       Character Sheet: Jody Starks

       Character Sheet: Tea Cake

  Their Eyes Were Watching God Class Review Notes 1

  Their Eyes Were Watching God Class Review Notes 2

 Film

Extra Works

                                 The Other Two by Edith Wharton MP3

                             The Quicksand by Edith Wharton  MP3

                                     The Other Two & The Quicksand Questions     

                               The White Heron by Sarah Orne Jewett MP3

                                 The White Heron Questions

Film Connection:

  The Age of Innocence (1993 film) by Martin Scorsese   trailer

     - Good illustration of Victorian repression

     - Good illustration of the importance placed by Victorians on societal appearance and financial standing

     - Good illustration of the importance of art, music and theater in Victorian society

     - View of Victorian clothing, manners and customs

     - Gives illustration of effects on men, not just women.

May 20: Test on Victorian Women

Study Power Points

     Key Quotes for Victorian Era

     Reflections of the Victorian Era

Individualism Test

November 24th

Power Point Review

Study for the Final Exam

Be ready and study for the final exam.

 

Wednesday, January 14th:

9:35 - 11:15 am  Block 3 American Literature Exam   Academic Study Sheets

 

Thursday, January 15th:

7:45 - 9:25 am   Block 4 Honors American Literature Exam  Honors Study Sheets

9:35 - 11:15 am  Block 5 Honors American Literature Exam  Honors Study Sheets 

Creative Synthesis Narrative Project

  Research one of the following individuals:

§  Jack Dempsey

§  Gertrude Ederle

§  Babe Ruth

§  Red Grange

§  Glenna Collett

§  Buck Weaver

§   “Shoeless” Joe Jackson

§  Suzanne Lenglen

§  Bill Tilden

§  Lou Gherig

§  Cooney Weiland

 

          Part 1:

o   Research your 1920s sports figure.

o   Find three reliable internet sources on your sports figure (and

o   Cite all three sources in APA format and make sure the citation is complete.

Example:

Donaldson, S. (1981). F. scott fitzgerald. Retrieved

              from http://people.brandeis.edu/~teuber/fitzgeraldbio.html

Bruccoli, M. J. (1994). Brief life of fitzgerald. Retrieved from

                http://www.fscottfitzgeraldsociety.org/biography/index.html

Willett, E. (1998). F. scott fitzgerald and the american dream. Pbs. Retrieved

                from http://www.pbs.org/kteh/amstorytellers/bios.html

 

If you are unsure of what I mean by "reliable", read the following:

http://www.library.illinois.edu/ugl/howdoi/webeval.html 

 

http://homeworktips.about.com/od/researchandreference/a/internet.htm

 

If you are unsure of what I mean by "APA format" for electronic resources, read the following:

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/10/

·         Due December 12, 2014.

         

        Part 2:

o   Create a story using your sports figure as a character and incorporating information that you found in your research.

o   The sports figure should look back and consider:

§  What was their greatest regret?

§  What was their greatest achievement?

§  Would they want to do anything differently if they could go back?

§  The narrative should be a first person Narrative, just like Nick in The Great Gatsby.

-     Conference with the teacher on your rough draft on December 19, 2014.

         The conference is worth a grade and coming without a draft will result in a zero.

         

       Part 3:

o   Type up your Mock Autobiography in Times New Roman size 12 font.

o   Double spaced, 1 inch margins.

o   The Mock Autobiography should be two FULL pages long.

o   You will have a cover page for your heading, the heading does not go on the text pages AND the cover page does not count towards the two page length requirement.

o   You need to attach the citations page and the rough draft.  (You will not receive credit without them, especially if the rough draft is EXACTLY THE SAME as the final draft.)

o   Final Draft Due Thursday, January 8th, 2015

title

Current Events, Non-fiction Reading

Americans Believe Ebola Poses A Much Bigger Threat To Them Than It Actually Does

First Ebola case diagnosed in US: Here's why you don't need to panic; a question and answer

October 1, 2014                Follow the directions on the KWL sheet and read the articles